Today is Pancake Tuesday!

Christians all over he world are celebrating Shrove Tuesday today. Tomorrow is Ash Wednesday which is the beginning of the season of Lent. We are to begin fasting for six weeks preceding Easter, which is the biggest Christian Holiday. Most people think Christmas is the most important time but Christians believe Christ rose from the dead on Good Friday and went to heaven on Easter Sunday. It’s supposed to be more important although it does seem Christmas is celebrated with more fanfare. 

Today is the last day we can feast. I know in North America we have adopted the tradition of eating pancakes on Shrove Tuesday. I don’t know if other countries do this too. We don’t even refer to today as Shrove Tuesday. It’s known as Pancake Tuesday.

When I was growing up and when I was raising my own children I always had pancakes for dinner. Mostly we eat pancakes for breakfast, except for today. In the Life Skills class the students made pancakes too. My student had the job of pouring the batter on the griddle, waiting for them to brown, flip them over and put them on a plate. One of the other students made the batter and two other students put butter and maple syrup in small containers. Finally the last student rolled the cart with the yummy treat down the hall to the offices for the administration to sample. It all went very well.

Will you be having pancakes today?

  

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12 thoughts on “Today is Pancake Tuesday!

  1. In the UK Pancake Day is a VERY big deal. Pancakes are not like North American ones but more the size of a dinner plate. However, unlike a Crêpe in France they would traditionally be cooked using lard or beef dripping rather than butter. Crêpe in France are not eaten in the south but in the butter making regions of Normandy and Brittany hence not using Olive Oil to cook them. Ash Wednesday, however is barely recognised these days in England whereas at home in Rural France the tradition of burning the palms from palm Sunday and using the ash to annoint the face of the faithful is strictly adhered to. The school and nursery age children in our village all look as though they are sporting Bindhi! In England Pancakes are enjoyed traditionally with lemon and sugar or with Tate and Lyle’s Golden Syrup but these days maple is very much en vogue. In France pancakes are eaten earlier in February (2nd) to celebrate 40 days after Christmas ‘Chandeleur’ or Candlemas is a big excuse to cook up a barrel load of batter and flip some pancakes. This year, I am trying my hand at North American pancakes made with buttermilk and serving with some of that yummy maple syrup …. hopefuly I won’t burn the kitchen down 🙂

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  2. Hi, Cathy,

    I have never heard of Pancake or even Shrove Tuesday. I found it interesting since I’ve been a Christian all my life. I wanted to say that you stated Christians believe Jesus went to Heaven on the third day, but we believe He rose and walked on earth, revealing Himself to many for 40 days before He ascended into Heaven. I’m sure it was a mis-write so I wanted to mention it. Thanks for sharing about Pancake Tuesday.

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  3. I didn’t have all the ingredients – it is only grocery shopping day on Thursday. We will have a belated one. Those pancakes have made me soooooo hungry. I used to love pancakes with sugar and lemon squeezed on top. Delicious

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  4. The day is called Vastendag which literally means the day the Fast begins. I don’t remember any tradition in food for this day though. But we do eat pancakes for dinner. To be precise, in the Netherlands we don’t eat them for breakfast! Always lunch or dinner. And ours are thinner then the American ones too, though not as thin as French crepes.

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